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  1. #651
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    On the bright side you did figure out what was causing the issues. Seems like they never end eh?

  2. #652
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    Glad you're getting it sorted out!

  3. #653
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    Do I have any warranty left on this transmission?

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge
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  4. #654
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    I would have just filed them as you mentioned...

  5. #655
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
    If there is a crack in the metal, it will continue to grow over time. I'm having the areas where cracks have formed machined off.
    Are the thin black lines the cracks? Or are you assuming micro fractures in the metal?

    So they will just mill off a small area of the damaged splines I assume?

  6. #656
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    Let’s get this back on track.


    To continue the oil pump disassembly, there is a cup spring that needs to be removed, which is the dark grey round piece with “fingers” in the image below:

    Click here to enlarge

    To remove the cup spring required tools I don’t own, so I took the assembly to a local transmission shop, and they had it off in about 15 seconds. Then pulling a few more things off, the assembly looked like this:

    Click here to enlarge

    Continuing to tear down the transmission:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    All done:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    So why am I tearing down the transmission this far? Pretty simple answer: To improve the oil system.

    The OEM transmission oil system is designed to handle heat from “spirited” commuting. It is not designed for a racing environment, and certainly not for drag racing which adds a tremendous amount of heat in the staging process. Add to that nearly tripling the power output of the stock engine, and we are well outside the cooling system’s designed operating parameters.

    To define the cooling requirements of the new powertrain, I first need to identify how the OEM system works. This is the primary reason why I’m tearing down the oil pump, and the transmission case. Secondly, making modifications to the transmission case is a lot simpler with all the internals removed. (More on this later)

    The oil pump in the ZF-5HP19 has enormous flow potential. Rated for 24cc per revolution, that works out to 19 liters/minute at idle! At 7000 RPM that’s 168 liters/minute, which is more than many engine’s water pumps can flow. (This is a contributing factor in why automatic transmissions consume so much engine power) With this fact in mind, I set about understanding where this oil flow volume goes.

    This is the 5HP19 valvebody:

    Click here to enlarge

    It has a total of 3 switching solenoids to control the actuation of the clutch packs, and 4 PWM solenoids for controlling oil pressure to various circuits. Also included in the valvebody wiring harness is an oil temp sensor, an input shaft speed sensor, and an output shaft speed sensor.

    The hole at the top center of the valvebody housing is where the oil filter housing is attached.

    Flipping the valvebody over, we find that there are 2 plastic tubes for oil flow:

    Click here to enlarge

    The tube on the right is where the oil from the filter passes through the valvebody and into the oil pump inlet.

    The tube on the left is where the oil from the oil pump outlet passes into the valvebody, to be used for controlling and lubricating the transmission functions.

    A closer look:

    Click here to enlarge



    This is where the 2 plastic tubes attach to the oil pump assembly:

    Click here to enlarge

    The port on the right is the oil inlet, (From the filter) and the one of the left is the oil pump outlet. You can see that there is a valve (Piston) inserted in the outlet with 4 holes through it, I’ll get to how this works shortly.

    This is a top view of the oil pump housing with the pump gears removed:

    Click here to enlarge

    Oil enters the housing through the inlet port is on the top left, flows over the outlet port, (Where “filter-in” is written) around the housing to a ramp labeled “in”, where it then enters the pump gears. The pressurized oil then exits the pump gears on the ramp labeled “out”, and flows into the pressure control piston.

    This is the oil pump assembly that sits on top of the housing pictured above:

    Click here to enlarge

    *Note - The inlet and outlet sides are reversed because I’ve faced the pump upright to take the picture.

    As you can see, this pump uses both the inside and outside gear teeth to pump oil around the divider in the middle. This makes the pump flow more than conventional gerotor oil pumps. An example of a gerotor pump is the M54 oil pump assembly shown below:

    Click here to enlarge



    This is the pressure control piston:

    Click here to enlarge

    Oil from the pump is directed to the area where the 4 holes are in the piston. The pressurized oil passes through these holes, and then goes into the valvebody.

    Combining the pressure control piston together with a spring and a spring positioning sleeve controls oil pressure. The image below shows these pieces as removed from the oil pump housing:

    Click here to enlarge

    How this works is that a certain volume of oil can flow through the 4 holes. When the pump provides more oil than the 4 holes can flow, it pushes on the piston compressing the spring, and opens a bypass port. The bypass port then directs oil back into the pump inlet, essentially re-circulating it without the pump pulling any more oil through the inlet filter.

    This is the pressure control piston in the closed position, where it does not bypass any oil:

    Click here to enlarge


    This is the pressure control piston in the open position, where it bypasses oil:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    So while the oil pump may be able to flow large amounts of oil, not all of this oil is circulated through the transmission.

    The next step is to identify where the oil cooling circuit fluid comes from, and where it goes. In the mean time I’ve sent the transmission case to the welding shop to have a pair of -8 AN bungs welded on.

    The stator spline was also removed from the main oil pump housing:

    Click here to enlarge

    Removing this piece was actually a little more difficult than I expected. It wouldn’t budge by hand, so I used a plastic hammer and rotated the housing giving little taps to get it out. (To put it back in, I’ll probably freeze it to get it to shrink a little)

    I dropped the stator spline off at the machine shop yesterday, and I should have it back tomorrow with the damaged spline ends machined off.



    The other thing I had time to do was go through the wiring harness and prove out all the connections I had listed:

    Click here to enlarge

    I’m doing this now, as it’s really easy with everything out. Eventually I’ll be running a stand-alone controller on this transmission, and will need a correct wiring schematic to install it. (I don’t trust any of the online documentation I’ve found) I’ve also found that I don’t like the position of the oil temp sensor, so I may look at installing one of my own in a more suitable location.
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  7. #657
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
    Let’s get this back on track.


    To continue the oil pump disassembly, there is a cup spring that needs to be removed, which is the dark grey round piece with “fingers” in the image below:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...542e7cf6-1.jpg

    To remove the cup spring required tools I don’t own, so I took the assembly to a local transmission shop, and they had it off in about 15 seconds. Then pulling a few more things off, the assembly looked like this:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...de100e5b-1.jpg

    Continuing to tear down the transmission:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...ca2fa8ab-1.jpg

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...d56424ff-1.jpg

    All done:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...d7fbfd7a-1.jpg

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...5896d66d-1.jpg

    So why am I tearing down the transmission this far? Pretty simple answer: To improve the oil system.

    The OEM transmission oil system is designed to handle heat from “spirited” commuting. It is not designed for a racing environment, and certainly not for drag racing which adds a tremendous amount of heat in the staging process. Add to that nearly tripling the power output of the stock engine, and we are well outside the cooling system’s designed operating parameters.

    To define the cooling requirements of the new powertrain, I first need to identify how the OEM system works. This is the primary reason why I’m tearing down the oil pump, and the transmission case. Secondly, making modifications to the transmission case is a lot simpler with all the internals removed. (More on this later)

    The oil pump in the ZF-5HP19 has enormous flow potential. Rated for 24cc per revolution, that works out to 19 liters/minute at idle! At 7000 RPM that’s 168 liters/minute, which is more than many engine’s water pumps can flow. (This is a contributing factor in why automatic transmissions consume so much engine power) With this fact in mind, I set about understanding where this oil flow volume goes.

    This is the 5HP19 valvebody:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...5cef8492-1.jpg

    It has a total of 3 switching solenoids to control the actuation of the clutch packs, and 4 PWM solenoids for controlling oil pressure to various circuits. Also included in the valvebody wiring harness is an oil temp sensor, an input shaft speed sensor, and an output shaft speed sensor.

    The hole at the top center of the valvebody housing is where the oil filter housing is attached.

    Flipping the valvebody over, we find that there are 2 plastic tubes for oil flow:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...08342b62-1.jpg

    The tube on the right is where the oil from the filter passes through the valvebody and into the oil pump inlet.

    The tube on the left is where the oil from the oil pump outlet passes into the valvebody, to be used for controlling and lubricating the transmission functions.

    A closer look:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...014dc756-1.jpg



    This is where the 2 plastic tubes attach to the oil pump assembly:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...085f7ee9-1.jpg

    The port on the right is the oil inlet, (From the filter) and the one of the left is the oil pump outlet. You can see that there is a valve (Piston) inserted in the outlet with 4 holes through it, I’ll get to how this works shortly.

    This is a top view of the oil pump housing with the pump gears removed:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...c84bc7ed-1.jpg

    Oil enters the housing through the inlet port is on the top left, flows over the outlet port, (Where “filter-in” is written) around the housing to a ramp labeled “in”, where it then enters the pump gears. The pressurized oil then exits the pump gears on the ramp labeled “out”, and flows into the pressure control piston.

    This is the oil pump assembly that sits on top of the housing pictured above:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...2a9e1d61-1.jpg

    *Note - The inlet and outlet sides are reversed because I’ve faced the pump upright to take the picture.

    As you can see, this pump uses both the inside and outside gear teeth to pump oil around the divider in the middle. This makes the pump flow more than conventional gerotor oil pumps. An example of a gerotor pump is the M54 oil pump assembly shown below:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...dOct2520-1.jpg



    This is the pressure control piston:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...1664b90f-1.jpg

    Oil from the pump is directed to the area where the 4 holes are in the piston. The pressurized oil passes through these holes, and then goes into the valvebody.

    Combining the pressure control piston together with a spring and a spring positioning sleeve controls oil pressure. The image below shows these pieces as removed from the oil pump housing:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...b291423c-1.jpg

    How this works is that a certain volume of oil can flow through the 4 holes. When the pump provides more oil than the 4 holes can flow, it pushes on the piston compressing the spring, and opens a bypass port. The bypass port then directs oil back into the pump inlet, essentially re-circulating it without the pump pulling any more oil through the inlet filter.

    This is the pressure control piston in the closed position, where it does not bypass any oil:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...9613742c-1.jpg


    This is the pressure control piston in the open position, where it bypasses oil:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...0c20e606-1.jpg

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...3470ce17-1.jpg

    So while the oil pump may be able to flow large amounts of oil, not all of this oil is circulated through the transmission.

    The next step is to identify where the oil cooling circuit fluid comes from, and where it goes. In the mean time I’ve sent the transmission case to the welding shop to have a pair of -8 AN bungs welded on.

    The stator spline was also removed from the main oil pump housing:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...8685d518-1.jpg

    Removing this piece was actually a little more difficult than I expected. It wouldn’t budge by hand, so I used a plastic hammer and rotated the housing giving little taps to get it out. (To put it back in, I’ll probably freeze it to get it to shrink a little)

    I dropped the stator spline off at the machine shop yesterday, and I should have it back tomorrow with the damaged spline ends machined off.



    The other thing I had time to do was go through the wiring harness and prove out all the connections I had listed:

    http://www.bimmerboost.com/images/im...fd955823-1.jpg

    I’m doing this now, as it’s really easy with everything out. Eventually I’ll be running a stand-alone controller on this transmission, and will need a correct wiring schematic to install it. (I don’t trust any of the online documentation I’ve found) I’ve also found that I don’t like the position of the oil temp sensor, so I may look at installing one of my own in a more suitable location.
    That's a spectacular update...

  8. #658
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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
    That's a spectacular update...
    ...on a spectacular forum.

    Back in the shop again tomorrow. Click here to enlarge
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  9. #659
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    Iíve forgotten how much work this stuff is.

    2 solid days of working on the car, and it doesnít really feel like much progress has been made. But I am completely happy with what has been done, and thatís all that counts.

    The transmission case now has -8 AN fittings for the oil cooler lines:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Whatís not pictured is all the cutting and shaping to get the -8 AN pieces to fit on the side of the transmission inside the transmission tunnel. To do this I had the transmission case mounted to the engine in the car, then worked on the mock up of pieces before sending everything out to be welded.

    The next step for the transmission is to get the stator spline back from the machine shopÖas of this morning it still wasnít done, but Iíve been promised it for Monday morning. Perhaps Iíll have the transmission back together then?


    This is obviously not what Iíd call a step forward:

    Click here to enlarge

    Originally, I used a flex tube with wire braid on the inside, which is a big no-no. They are known to deteriorate over time, and can cause blockage resulting in un-controlled boost spikes.

    Another issue was that the wastegate tube hit the FCAB once I installed it, so routing needed to be adjusted.

    Then there was the fact that the new flex tube, with spiral inner core, was both longer and wider than the old flex tube. When mocking up in place, it simply wouldnít fit where the old flex tube was positioned.

    The flex tube and wastegate positioning isnít a new problem; Iíve been scratching my head on this one for a couple of months. The solution was to just start working on it, and things seemed to find a way to work out. Early next week I should have the new wastegate tube finished upÖ.itís got a lot of bends in it but Iím really happy with how clean the routing is for the exhaust flow.

    Some of you may remember this:

    Click here to enlarge

    I cracked the left rear trailing arm trying to press a driveshaft spline out of the hub.

    The replacement trailing arm came from my old 330Ci project, via Florida, and had some damaged wheel studs stuck in the hub. This week I finally dealt with the stuck wheel studs, and I thought it would be useful for others to see what I did.

    To start with, I cut off the ends of the wheel studs:

    Click here to enlarge

    Next, I hammered on a stud extractor socket:

    Click here to enlarge

    And finally, an impact gun was used to zip the stud out:

    Click here to enlarge

    With the studs removed, I ran a thread restoration bit through all the holes to clear out the old threadlock. Then the new wheel studs were installed.


    Installing wheel studs into the front wheel hubs was a bit of a problem by hand. The wheel studs need to be torqued down to 30 lb/ft, but the wheel hubs werenít mounted making them tough to hold. Break out the fender roller:

    Click here to enlarge

    Easy work.

    Click here to enlarge


    Staring to plumbing the fuel, nitrous, and meth lines in:

    Click here to enlarge

    Making up the meth lines for the 2 nozzles:

    Click here to enlarge

    Finished meth plumbing:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge


    The fuel system lines are all finished as well, but I find them rather boring so I never took any pictures. Still to plumb is the engine oil filter and cooler, and the transmission oil cooler.

    The transmission cooler location and engine oil cooler location have been finalized. Iím just waiting on rubber isolation brackets to arrive before finishing up the welding required.
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  10. #660
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    They say a photo is worth a thousand words....well your photo packed posts are worth bazillions!!

    Amazing work! The attention to detail and high degree of work is jaw dropping.
    2002 E46 M3 6MT | Jet Black . Black Nappa | My GermanBoost Build Thread
    2009 E90 M3 DCT | Melbourne Red . Speed Cloth

  11. #661
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
    Some of you may remember this:

    Click here to enlarge

    I cracked the left rear trailing arm trying to press a driveshaft spline out of the hub.
    Makes me feel better that someone else had such a tough time with this as well (I snapped the ear off completely in the press).

    Great to see you keep plugging through given things always take many multiples longer than anticipated. Look forward to the next update!

  12. #662
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by flipm3 Click here to enlarge
    They say a photo is worth a thousand words....well your photo packed posts are worth bazillions!!

    Amazing work! The attention to detail and high degree of work is jaw dropping.
    Thanks

    I think I'd find it a lot harder to share this stuff without pictures...or at least without "good" pictures. (I really dislike cell phone pics)

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by jbfrancis3 Click here to enlarge
    Makes me feel better that someone else had such a tough time with this as well (I snapped the ear off completely in the press).

    Great to see you keep plugging through given things always take many multiples longer than anticipated. Look forward to the next update!
    You had the same problem too?! Now I don't feel so bad...thanks for sharing that.

    Everything takes longer than expected, which I find really frustrating at times because my profession is very deadline oriented and I'm fairly good with that. After years of doing this stuff, I realized I wasn't failing...just that an all-custom project develops like this. My work stuff in contrast is fairly well sorted with regard to equipment and methodology, so it wasn't a fair comparison.

    I got asked yesterday by someone at the shop how much power I want to make. My response was that I just want the engine to run!
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  13. #663
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    high class modifications. Awesome Adam.
    E36 M3 Euro TT 60-130 mph 4.49 s
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    Awesome update Adam! Lots going into that auto trans!

    I have a question that I know you've answered before but am having trouble finding it. What kind of hose are you using? I have to make lines for my oil filter relocation, oil cooler as well as coolant lines for the turbo.

    Still trying to figure out how to make thermol syphoning work in my set up!

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Twinturbom3 Click here to enlarge
    high class modifications. Awesome Adam.
    Thank you Mert. No 4WD planned. Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Dan3312 Click here to enlarge
    Awesome update Adam! Lots going into that auto trans!

    What kind of hose are you using?
    Thanks Dan. Hose is Russell Proclassic.
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    I got the stator spline back from the machine shop today, and it still doesn't fit.

    On turning the damaged material off in the lathe, there is now a leading and lagging edge on each spline. The leading edge has a clean square edged cut on it, but the lagging edge has some distortion that needs to be filed off. So....one by one I've been filing the edges of each spline...but I'm not done yet.

    What occupied most of my day was work on the wastegate pipe, or more specifically the piece that goes from the Tial MVR wastegate back into the 3" exhaust tubing. Call it a merge if you like, because that's how I've treated it; the darn thing should flow pretty well. I don't think the guy doing the TIG welding likes me very much...as I've laid down one wicked tight angle that will be tough to push a puddle into. Tomorrow we'll see if it all lines up the way I had hoped.

    The more I work with the Tial MVR, the more I like it. Tial Sport provides all the fittings you could want, and it's got a side port for the top chamber which I'm really appreciating. Once you see how the wastegate sits, you'll understand that one a bit better.

    I've been on the fence about running the nitrous system dry, but to start with I'm keeping things simple and setting it up to run wet. Making up the fuel feed line to the fuel solenoid was a bit odd, as the FPR is only a couple of inches away from the solenoid, but you can't connect them. They are at such angles, and so close to each other, that you can't fit a short piece of AN line between them. The solution was to run 90 degree fittings on the solenoid and FPR, and loop 18" of -6AN line down under the intake tube and back up. Normally I'd just move something to line up better, but when welding is involved, it's a lot easier to use parts you have on the shelf to move things along.
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  17. #667
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by PEI330Ci Click here to enlarge
    I've been on the fence about running the nitrous system dry, but to start with I'm keeping things simple and setting it up to run wet.
    I'm somewhat surprised you are determined to go the nitrous route again.

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
    I'm somewhat surprised you are determined to go the nitrous route again.
    I understand what you are saying, but it's not something I'm worried about. When you can lay out all the variables, and have control mechanisms available, there really is very low risk.
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  19. #669
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    I got the stator spline to fit into the torque converter!

    More later tonight!
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    Like!

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    AWESOME!!!

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Reputation: Yes | No
    It doesnít look like much, but this piece of pipe has been one heck of a challenge to fabricate:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    As Iíll describe in better detail later, each of the 3 bends was meticulously placed to guide the pipe within 1mm of obstacles.


    Bolted to the exhaust manifold with the wastegate attached:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    The flex pipe is just lightly in contact with the FCAB heat shield on one side, and also touching the downpipe V-Band clamp on the other. Moving it any further up would cause it to be wedged (and deformed) between the V-Band clamp and the FCAB. Moving the entire flex pipe above these obstructions would place the inlet above the WG outlet on the exhaust manifold, and require some elaborate looping of the exhaust flow to make the connection. (Not optimal)

    I mention the above, because even with some careful placement, the wastegate still ends up sitting lower than floor of the car:

    Click here to enlarge

    And just a little visual reminder why there is so little space in this area:

    Click here to enlarge

    The automatic transmission, and oil pan specifically, takes up a ton of space. Putting a manual transmission in the car would free up a lot of space and give room for better placement of the downpipe and wastegate pipe. But weíre not going that routeÖ

    The other option would be to stick with a 38mm wastegate, and 1.5Ē wastegate pipe which would make fitment a lot easier. But, this wouldnít flow as well as the 44mm wastegate and 1.75Ē pipeÖ.and I think Iím going to need all the flow I can get with nitrous.

    So here I am trying to cut the WG outlet pipe to merge with the downpipe:

    Click here to enlarge

    Iíll be honest: I had a really hard time with this, and eventually gave up after I had cut and ground too much material off. The extreme merge angle, and compound pipe angle required was a bit too much for this hobbiest.

    The solution was to break the pipe down into 2 sections, which worked pretty well although it still took a lot of grinding to get everything to sit right:

    Click here to enlarge

    Cutting the hole in the downpipe for the wastegate tie-in:

    Click here to enlarge

    At this point I sent everything out to be TIG welded together.
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  23. #673
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    You can’t mount a pressure sensor directly to the exhaust manifold, and expect it to live very long. It will melt. The solution is to remotely mount the pressure sensor, and connect it to the exhaust with what’s known as a “stand-off” tube. This tube is usually made of stainless steel, (to be able to handle the extreme heat) and then some sort of high-temp flexible hose is used to connect to the pressure sensor.

    AEM sells a complete exhaust pressure kit, but for various reasons I was determined to make my own. Here’s some of the parts I used:

    Click here to enlarge

    The SS tube is from a nitrous kit, and the other parts I ordered from my local speed shop.

    The SS pipe was TIG welded directly to the -3 AN stainless steel hose end:

    Click here to enlarge

    A -3 AN to 1/8” NPT fitting was cut in half, and the -3 AN side was welded to the wastegate pipe:

    Click here to enlarge

    The EGT sensor and stand-off tube attached to the WG pipe:

    Click here to enlarge

    Note: The other end of the SS stand-off tube is having an SS air fitting TIG welded directly to it. Pictures of the completed stand-off tube will be shown later.



    Nitrous line routed, and terminated:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge



    And what are these?

    Click here to enlarge

    Oil cooler goodies of course!


    Instructions from Setrab:

    Click here to enlarge


    The brackets mount to the Setrab oil coolers with rubber isolation inserts:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge


    -8 AN Hose end that connects directly to the transmission oil cooler:

    Click here to enlarge

    Note the smooth radius inlet.

    Installed:

    Click here to enlarge

    Both the engine oil and transmission oil coolers ready for mock-up in their new homes:

    Click here to enlarge
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    The damaged stator input shaft:

    Click here to enlarge

    All fixed up:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    What I found worked best to clean up and put a tapper on the splines, was a very small tapered round file. I tried a triangle file, but it was hard to work with and you had to file each edge on it’s own. Using a round file, it kind of centers itself between splines nicely.


    Re-assembling the transmission:

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Putting the stator shaft back into the oil pump assembly:

    Click here to enlarge

    Note: The stator shaft is interference fit into the oil pump assembly. To get it into the assembly without a press, I put it in the freezer for an hour, and warmed up the oil pump assembly with a heat gun. The result was that it slipped in easily by hand, but you have to align the bolt-holes up really fast before the heat transfers between the pieces.

    Setting the steel spring in place:

    Click here to enlarge

    I took the assembly to a transmission shop to compress the spring and have the locking clips inserted.

    Oil pump assembly, and D/G clutches mounted to the transmission case:

    Click here to enlarge

    Installing the valvebody:


    Click here to enlarge

    Oil pan installed:

    Click here to enlarge
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    Awesome! So now what?
    Click here to enlarge
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